Over 4 million Australians live with a disability. Over one billion worldwide. The Australian disability tourism market is worth an estimated 11 billion...

How accessibility makes for a more liveable city

Location:

200
Australia

How accessibility makes for a more liveable city

Speakers

Eckhard Kemmerer - man looking at camera with brown hair, blue eyes, glasses and a small smile

Eckhard Kemmerer

Scientist & Co-founder of Briometrix

An innovator with Parkinson’s that is determined to map the world over for wheelchair users and produce better outcomes for people with disabilities through smarter data.

A scientist and former C-level marketing executive who now specialises in bringing new ideas and innovation to life, he has worked on both sustaining and disruptive innovations. Eckhard's approach to innovation is influenced by his broad science education, the rigour of an MBA and 35 years of business experience. Eckhard has a constant thirst for knowledge and an ability to delve deeply and broadly into problems to see the fundamental innovations required to transform markets, categories, products and services.

Julia Suh

Founder of Small Shift and Urban Toolbox

Julia Suh is a leading voice in citizen-led urban development, and specialises in applying human-centred design as a tool for social change and advocacy. Julia’s purpose is to train and inspire communities to build a positive relationship with their local public spaces and each other. Small Shift does this by hiring people with barriers to employment and unlocking their potential to take the lead in city-making.

She has taught and practiced architecture, placemaking and urban design from New York, Auckland, Hanoi and Sydney, building an extensive knowledge of various communities and urban spaces that support or neglect them. In 2017, Julia was one of 10 Australians to be awarded Westpac Social Change Fellowship.

Julia received her M.Arch. from Yale University, B.Arch. with First Class Honours from the University of Auckland, and training in Qualitative Research Methods from the London School of Economics and Political Science.

Mark Tomkins

Access & Inclusion Officer

Mark Tomkins is a passionate community activist for the rights of people with disability seeking possibility and change for all Australians with disability. He is currently mentoring a number of young people with disabilities and is on a number of disability advisory committees in the Victoria Region.

Mark has held positions in Access and Inclusion as manager across four councils, utilising a degree in urban and town planning, and is a specialist in accessiblity standards. From his athletic, acamedic, professional life, and as a person using a wheelchair — Mark has an insightful perspective on what makes a city liveable.

Pascal Perez

Pascal Perez

Director SMART Infrastructure Facility, University of Wollongong

Professor Pascal Perez is a world leader in participatory modelling of complex systems. He is the coeditor of Complex Science for a Complex World – Exploring Human Ecosystems with Agents (ANU-E-Press). Before joining the University of Wollongong, he has been a team leader at CSIRO and an associate professor at the Australian National University.

Professor Pascal Perez has 20 years' experience working in Southeast Asia, Western Africa, Pacific Island countries and Australia. He is responsible for the management and delivery of all aspects of infrastructure modelling and simulation at the SMART Infrastructure Facility, University of Wollongong. His research areas and expertise is urban liveability

Martin Heng

Martin Heng

Accessible Travel Manager and Editorial Advisor, Lonley Planet

Martin works for the iconic guidebook publisher Lonely Planet as accessible travel manager and editorial advisor, and recently appointed as chairman of Board of Directors at IDEAS.

His early career was as a freelance editor in London, Hong Kong, Tokyo and Melbourne in a wide variety of genres. Martin's long-term passion is visiting countries and regions off the beaten track.

Martin has always been lobbying for services for people with disabilities. He has founded a blog and a Pinterest account in 2013 to raise awareness on the issue and established the Travel for All community at Google+. Martin has published the Accessible Travel Online Resources guide for all those wanting to learn about accessible tourism destinations and experiences from around the world.

Martin brings a unique blend of being a person with a disability, an editorial advisor at Lonely Planet, masters degree at RMIT Melbourne and global experiences of what makes a liveable city.

William Verity

William Verity

Journalist and Author

William Verity has worked as a journalist and author for Australia's premier publishers and broadcasters. After a career as a print and audio journalist, he is now working as a digital media specialist for the Leader of the NSW Government in the Upper House. He is also producing podcasts, online features, and communications material for the University of Wollongong.

 

Nick Morris

Nick Morris

O.A.M, Dual Paralympian, B.A. Science (Human Movement), Dip. Education

Nick holds a degree in human movement, is an accredited accessibility consultant with the Accessibility Consultants Association of Australia and has qualifications for both the secondary and vocational educational sectors. In 1996, as part of the Aussie Rollers, he won a Paralympic Gold medal in Atlanta.

In 1997, Nick was awarded an Order of Australia medal for his services to sport. After consulting on the 2000 Olympics and Paralympics, Nick was invited to become the inaugural expert accessibility advisor for the International Paralympic Committee which he did from 2004–2012. This required him to mentor organisers of Commonwealth, Asian, Pan American and Paralympic Games as to how to create accessibility within their cities. Nick has also been on ABC TV program New Inventors as a judge and is currently a judge for the Australian Event Awards.

For the last 20 years Nick Morris, Director of Moriss Access Consulting, has been helping to identify the key issues of accessibility and find practical solutions for planners, developers, architects (building, interiors and landscape) and building consultants. Ultimately, to ensure they provide functional and technical compliance to relevant legislation.

Access and Inclusion

For more accessibility information see the Vivid accessibility map.

  • Wheelchair accessible - Access to the venue is suitable for wheelchairs (toilets, ramps/lifts etc.) and designated wheelchair spaces are available.
  • Auslan Interpreted - Auslan interpreted events are for audiences who are Deaf and use Australian Sign Language (Auslan) as their primary means of communication. Experienced Auslan theatre interpreters stand to the side of the stage and translate what the speakers are saying or Auslan signing the text and dialogue live. Audiences requiring this service are seated in the section closest to the interpreter to ensure good sightlines.

Event Details

Over 4 million Australians live with a disability. Over one billion worldwide. The Australian disability tourism market is worth an estimated 11 billion dollars. Yet when it comes to liveability and city design, disability is often the overlooked part of the equation.

Liveability is a huge factor in designing better cities. It’s the central focus driving much of the innovation in Sydney, from the development of the Western Sydney hub to dealing with public transport and traffic congestion to including ‘green space’ and environmental concerns in the planning process. Creating safe, usable and accessible spaces for people with disabilities often comes last on the list of priorities.

What if we took the reverse approach to solve the accessibility part of the problem first? Would the benefits trickle down to all city dwellers? Making safer, easier to navigate and more inclusive infrastructure creates opportunities for all.

Our panel of experts explores how putting disability and inclusion at the forefront of the town planning agenda can lead to better, more liveable cities for everyone. Let's bring together people interested in liveability, architecture, innovation, technology, disability and social justice to unlock the potential of better cities by planning through the lens of disability, accessibility and inclusion.

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Access and Inclusion

For more accessibility information see the Vivid accessibility map.

  • Wheelchair accessible - Access to the venue is suitable for wheelchairs (toilets, ramps/lifts etc.) and designated wheelchair spaces are available.
  • Auslan Interpreted - Auslan interpreted events are for audiences who are Deaf and use Australian Sign Language (Auslan) as their primary means of communication. Experienced Auslan theatre interpreters stand to the side of the stage and translate what the speakers are saying or Auslan signing the text and dialogue live. Audiences requiring this service are seated in the section closest to the interpreter to ensure good sightlines.