Should artists be restricted by cultural boundaries when creating their work? Join us as we explore the blurry lines between cultural exchange...

Borrowed Voice: Freedom of Expression vs Cultural Appropriation

Location:

2010 NSW
Australia

Venue:
National Art School (NAS)
Borrowed Voice

Event Details

Should artists be restricted by cultural boundaries when creating their work? 

Join us as we explore the blurry lines between cultural exchange and cultural appropriation and their effect on the production of creative works in Australia by tipping a traditional debate on its head.

Teams of artists, writers and comedians will question the ethics of representation and the concepts of identity politics and political correctness through a ‘reversed-debate’ format. ’Affirmative’ speakers will argue the negative standpoint to highlight the shortcomings of the opposing view, with the  aim of exploring this serious and contentious subject through an entertaining, thought-provoking and engaging discussion. 

MC:
Sunil Badami 

Debaters:

·  Deng Adut — lawyer and author

·  Bronwyn Bancroft — artist and illustrator

·  Daisy Cousens — writer and journalist

·  Thomas Keneally — novelist

·  Caroline Marcus — reporter, anchor and columnist

·  Chris Taylor —  comedy writer, performer and broadcaster.

 

This event is presented by Sydney PEN and Settlement Services International (SSI) as part of the SSI Speakers’ Series. 

Access and Inclusion

  • Wheelchair accessible - Access to the venue is suitable for wheelchairs (toilets, ramps/lifts etc.) and designated wheelchair spaces are available.
  • Hearing loop - A hearing loop (sometimes called an audio induction loop) is a special type of sound system for use by people with hearing aids. The hearing loop provides a magnetic, wireless signal that is picked up by the hearing aid when it is set to 'T' (Telecoil) setting. Many venues have an induction hearing loop system. Check if your venue has this system.
  • Companion card - The Companion Card is for people with a significant permanent disability, who always need a companion to provide attendant care type support in order to participate at most available community venues and activities.